,(

I

t2t-

AND STREAM.

\ Weekly Journal of the Rod and Gun.

Angling, Shooting, the Kennel, Practical Natural History,

FiSHCULTURE, YaCHTING AND CaNOEING,

ANP THE

NCULCATION IN MEN AND WOMEN OF A HEALTHY INTEREST

IN OUTDOOR RECREATION AND STUDY.

VOLUME LXI.

July, 1903 December, 1903.

PUBLISHED BY THE FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY,

NEW YORKJ

1903

FOREST AND STREAM

INDEX— VOLUME LXl,

EDITORIAL.

Accidents wtiijijA are not Accidents.

. Adirondack. . Elk ,

Alaska Indians and'^ait'ik

America's Cup

Page.

213

213

293

195

Ang^j^^g " SI

Aiitomobiling- and the Road 159

Beardslee, L. A gct3

Bird Collecting rerniits 373

Blooming Grove Park Charter 373

Childishness of the Grown-Up ..101

Chinook '.i^l

Closed and Open Mind 141

Colorado Deer Skins 333

Color Prof ect'ion . . . ; 233

Concerning Technical Language 61

Connecticut Trespass Law ^ 273

Currituck Sound.. 413

Dismal Swamp , , , .:• 233

Pog Barking at Night 101

Dog Days , ; 373

Dj-namiter I77

Engineering and Fishing 62

English U"ays 313

Fishing Rights 21

Fish Public in Private Waters 81

FoKEST AND Stream Thirty Years 121

Fourth of July Pistols 21

Frame, Chas. P 333

Game Owned by the State 101

Game Possession in Louisiana , 481

Game Preserves 1

Grouse Scarcity 413

Individual and Crowd .■ ., 413

Leading a Double Life 61

Maine Bertillon System 313

Maize Thieves 81

Missouri Steamboating. 121

Money by Mail 481

Mosquitoes and Music 21

Noise in the Night, A 101

October Days... 273

October '."ilfe

Orange County Law -. 195

Passing Days ... . . 383

Preserves and Sanctuaries... ...... - v !^- -141

Profanity and Pack 'Si^m^^^^^ . .:k\:if¥^

Rich and Poor ..ft;. 1

Rifle Match,' InterriaSb-iia^. .j^. .1-. > 41

Roosevelt as Sportsman. . .. ;V. .Ski. 437

Sentry's Blank .\j .'V-jS^ 195

Shooting, Earliest •. . .v: 177

Side-Hunt Devastation .313

Sportsmen and Others '.S'sf ..101

State Game Refuges i-.J^^. ...253

Steele, Thomas Sedgwick , i.213

Things as They Are 41

Titcojiib, John W 121

Trail Horses .461

Treasure Seekers 253

\\'hitc ITousc Dining Room ; 435

Woman in the Field ....293

Woman's Worry '. .435

Woodcock Snniilv 393

...159, 177

SPORT^SMAN TOURIST.

Page.

Alaska, Lost in 216

Back Trailing Horses 482

Bad Men 453

Beaver Bill 2

Bil'.y 462

Brc:iking the Chain 82

Buckskin^ Lodge 3

Cabin Plan 314

Camp-Fire on Fifth Avenue 464

Camp-Fire Stories from Canadian Woods... 23, 83

Camp Ltappy 22

Camphig in Ontario 161, 180, 198

Cave Exploration 395

Ch.' ed by Indians 235

C -;i,::i'.ng aEtna 62

Day in Nebraska 255

Dry Camp ". I;,;;. .334

Elysium by Buckboard 124, 142, 160

Feeling- Pleasant Under Difficulties 22

P'ronticr Relic 23

Garden Island of Champlain 214

Golden Plover 314

Graves, Nathaniel S 295

Grizzly Bear Bottom .; ;..462

Plave I Remembered? 464

ITusking Bec' and Bear Hunt S3

In Old Virginia 13

In the Wilds., ,122, 143

Kipling's Red Gods. . .274, 296, 315, 335, 356, 396, 399,

417, 464

lilamatii and Crater Lakes 234

Kut-ai-nah 103

Landsmen Afloat 179

Lost on the Staked Plains 197

Life in the Rockies .'.196

Lodges of the Blackfeet 374, 395, 415

iMaine Woods Songs 482

Mashpee 436

Mississippi, Floating Down the 11, 394

Monhegan- 144

^Moose Hunting in New Brunswick ....335

Mulcahy Shot for a Deer 454

,4lusing at Sarid Lake 243, 254, 396

^10^ Scene in Maine 295

^f,(5rth Carolina Incidents 314

Notes of Trail and Camp 125

"October in Nebraska -.295

One Day and Another 315

Packing^ Without Profanity 144

Passing of October (poetry) •. , 334

Personal Experience with a Moral 315

Pictures Difficult to Take 454

Plainsmen, Old Time 42

Ransacker's Commentaries 464

Raven Quiver 42

Red Gods 274, 381

Reforestation 162

Riding a Mule 355

St. Louis 414

Santa Catalina 178

Saratoga, the Frigate..., 217

Schlick, Theo. M 374

.Squeteague, Morning With 162

South Africa Hunt 274

Page.

Stoddard, Col. E. B 256

Story of a Stump 438

Summer Shower 255

Swallows (poetry) 294

Texas Bad Men 483

Thoreau 196, 294

Tipping , 375

Trapper's Thanksgiving 416

Tristan D'Acunha 82

Val del Bove ...102

^'irginia, In Old 13

\'oices from Spring (poetry) 354

Weather Signs 337

^\'he^ I am Gone 161

Wilds of St. Francis 354

^^'ordsworth's Boy of Winander 439

NATURAL HISTORY.

Adder Story ,. , 4OO

Adirondack Black Bear 484

Adirondack Elk ....375

Albatross at Home 440

American Ornithologists' Union 419

Animals and S.urgery 317

Animals of Pennsylvania and New Jersey.. 276, 337

Apes and Monkeys 23, 180, 359

Apple Tree 256, 317, 338

Batrachians and Reptiles 5, 63, 144, 163, 200

Bird Flight Times 375

Bird Jottings 256

Bird Preserves 146

Birds and the Fruit Grower 164

Birds and 'the State 317

Birds by the River ' 43

Canadian Birds 165

Carcajou 200, 219, 317, 357

Caribou, Grant on 4

Cat Intelligence : -375

Deer and Antelope Senses 84

Deer Scent 45

Eland for Australia 358

Entertainment for Man and Beast 257

Forestry at St. Louis 299

Foxes, Gray 236

Grouse, Self-Killing 299, 359

Hands, Substitutes for 483

Happy I-Iunting Grounds .165

ITorses, Back Trailing 465

Illinois Game and Song Birds 45

Instinct and Reason 5

Intelligence of Chicks 105

Intelligence of Wild Things 6, 104

Josiah, Advent of 275

KUdeer Plover 455

Labrador Duck ' 422, 465, 485

Lamprey Eel's Nest 165

Language of the Lower Animals 146

Mammals of Lower California 358

Mammals of Mt. Katahdin 44

Mammoth, the New St. Petersburg 275

Man and Brute 44, 125, 201, 217, 237

Mexican Mammals 400

Midsummer Notes 64

Mink from Maine Shell Heaps 125

Page

New York Zoological Society 33;!

Night Plawk in Town 46,

Night Hawk 41;

North Carolina Wild Horses 29'

Passenger Pigeon 27t

Pennsylvania Elk 29£

Prairie Dog in Texas 40{

Quail in the Clothes Basket 2{

Quail in Town ..31(

Reptile Notes g;

Season Signs 37;

Snake and Meal l;

Snakes I Have Met 45£

Songs of Birds in Confinement

Squirrels for City Park 4=

Stariings 40C;

Swallow and Swifts S4i

Texas Reptiles 37;

Thoreau as a Naturalist , 4S;

Wild Rice igcl

Zoo (Brooklyn) 104

GAME BAG AND GUN.

Adirondack Deer Season 401

Adirondack Deer 166

Adirondack Elk 221

vVdirondack Game Preserves 7, 46

Adirondack Story ...320

Alaska Grizzly Bear Hunt 360

I Antelope, My First , 127

I Antelope's Sight ; 64|

I Assiniboia -. 379;

! Bear Hunt 300

I

Bear Story ; 279i

i j

Biltmore Preserve 404

I Blue Motintain Park 65|

I Both S-itisfied 20!

Buncombe County 106

I California Day 467

! California Shooting 203,

!

Canada's Hunting Grounds... .126;

Canvasbacks at $20 per Pair 467

I

Caribou 378'

Chatham .Shooting 2S0|

Colorado Game Cases 341j

I

Comedy of Errors 1

Connecticut Trespass Law 166'

Deer in Connecticut 107

Deer, the First 45

Duck Cooking 466

Duck Shooting Extraordinary 280

English Grouse Shooting 202

Game Birds:

I.— The Woodcock 299!

II.— The Ruffed Grouse 318'

III. The Quail 33s''

IV. The Snipe 376

Game Preserves .......66, m, 129, 147, 320i

Game Protectors 129

Golden Plover 127

Great South Bay 4S5i

Grouse and Woodcock.... 466, 4S7'f

Illinois Game Commission Report 25S|

Italian Shooters 36!^

INDEX.

3

Page.

Java Deer Hunting 403

Lacey Law 463

Liege Firearms ...468

Life in the Rockies 237, 258, 278

Long Island Deer 379

Long Island Sport 277

Macaroni Powder 87

Maine and Its Game 257

Maine Association 46

Maine Big Game Grounds 361

Maine Big Game 465, 486

Maine, Down in. , 301

Maine Game Country 319

Maine Guides S6

INIaine Licenses 204

Maine Records 402

Maine Season 279, 379

Maine Summer Deer Killers Fined 221

Jilaine Woods 340

Maryland Ducking 239

Maryland Sliooting 361

Massachusetts 402

Massachusetts Deer 488

Massachusetts Fish and Game 279

Meadovvlark and Robin 25, 46

^Icadowlark in Kentucky 7

Me en Ellick en Ben 402

Mississippi Bottom 280

Mississippi Delta 362

Moose Head, Peculiar 401

Mount Tom Reserve 378

Nebraska 467

Nebraska Game Fields 219

New England 301, 319

New Hampshire Game 240

New Hampshire Trapping , 487

New York League 320, 485

Night Hawk 404

North Carolina Licenses 362

North- Carolina Protection -. 468

October (poetry) 259

"Our Feathered Game" 204

Pennsj'lvania Shooting 343

Pheasants in New York 220

i'ine County Deer Woods ■. 201

PossesBiou in Close Season 486

Possum Hunting, New Wrinkle 280

Preserve Question 341

Preserves -.• -404

Preserves and Game 203, 259

Preserves and \\'ild Lands 64

Profitable Buck 377

' Juail 33S

'Quail in France .' 377

.'^uail Without a Dog...... 340

"RuiTed Grouse 318

Scent i.37S

Sentries and Blank Cartridges 221

September Tide 240

Shells Resized 404

Snipe 376

Sourdnahimk 302

Sonth Africa 377

Sports and Sportsmen 106

Sportsnien 167

•Sportsmen and Others •■ ISl

State Game Preserves 280

Story of Fluster .-i..-. .;24

Teal Hole 105

Things Men Kill ..''6

Toy Pistols .25, 87

Uncle Doc's Hammerless 129

Upland Plover, Days With S4

\'ermont Notes 81.

\"irgijiia ,\ wakening f65

Virginia Shooting 342, 343

Wanted. jNIoral Courage 219

Waihinglon Game Law Decision. v w .; .221

\A'est, In the :..„.202

Wild Rice 302

Wisconsin Deer Shipments 487

Wisconsin Wardens Active 241

\\ oodchucks, Flaking 221

Woodcock 299

SEA AND RIVER FISHIiNG.

185

A, B, C. Fish School (.poetry)

Adirondack Camps on Slate Lands

Adirondack Fish Mortality 10

Adirondack Trout Season 182

.Alaska Salmon Fisheries 343

Albino Brook Trout 304

.'\merican Fisheries Society .....93, 111

.\nicrican Fishes 490

.•\nglin,g Contests in England .and Canada 343

.\n.uHiig in Japan 468

Angling in the Seventeenth Centurv ......441

Fage.

Asbury Park Tournament. 168

Bait and Buoys I4T

Barracuda in Hawaii U

Bass and Drinking Water , 130

Bass, Names of 261

Bass, Sizes and \\'eights 363

Bass in Walker Lake 27

Bluetish Records 283

Brook 27

Brook Fever 48

By the String (poetry) 185

Catfish Habits 245

Cincinnati Fishing Club 380

Crescent Moon 49

Cuvier Club Annual 468

Delaware River Canoe and Camp Life.. 26, 46, 66,87

Devil's Lake Fishing 107

Devil's Lake Trout 303

Dogfish Ravages 405

Dynamite Conviction. 184

Erie Harbor Pishing 470

Everglades 49

17ins 184

Fish Count 382

Flatboat's Long \'oyage 382

Florida Fishing 107

Florida Sea Bass 470

Flying Fish Flight. 282

Forest Fires and Fish Destruction 130

Fort \Vashington Camping 321

Freaks from the Ocean 88

Game Fish Decrease in Size .....488

Hearing in Fishes 362

Horse Mackerel, Giant 93

Killer Shark 150

Lak-e Champlain Pollution 282, 303, 322, 345, 490

Lake St. John Salmon 130

Lobster Situation .282

Maine Preserves 147

.Alaine A\'hitefish 205

AJanistce Camping 221

Alashpec Fishing 436

Maskinonge, Philology of 4(39, 490

Massachusetts. Fish and Game 244

Massachtisetts Fish and Game Commission .380

Alassacbusetts Fishing , 14S

Ministers Went a-Fishing -.-.3.02

Mink on the Fly ....,205

69

Page.

Tarpon Wire Snells 70

Tracadie Pleasant Flours 148

Trout, Deer and Exploring 130

Trout Fishing at Night 302

Trout Growth 469

Tuna Club Tournament 382

Tuna in' Nova Scotia 89

Vermont Fish and Game League 223

Vermont Fisliing Interests 282

Walk into the Wilds 364

Wall-eyed Pike in the Susquelianna 93

Whales on the Florida Coast 222

Without Wetting the Hook 108

Why Not? 129

World's Fair 322

YACHTING.

Alert ••*495

All- Around Small Boat 495

America's Cup Record 155

AiTierican Power Boat Association 383

Aspirant

Atlantic 116, 348, 408

Book Notices: Gardens of the Caribbees 348

liope's Small Yacht Const, and Rigging.

Afy sterious INIonster 27,

National Fishculture

Nebraska July Fishing.........

NcJjraska Waters 148

Xcpigon ..67, SO Eiectra *267

20u. 48

54

Boston Letter 304, 347, 386, 424, 474, 495, 512

Canada's Cup Defender 13, 34, 53, 74, 94, 113

Chicago Y^ C 472

Clarice Single-bander *225

Columbia Y^ C 494

Cruises :

A Cruise on the Sound 73

Annual Cruise of the Goodenough *14

Greenport to the Virgin's Breasts *265

The Cruise of a Catboat *224

Cruising Competition 31, 407, 470

Damage in Recent Gale *26S

P.ay.s Off Shore *425

Designs :

, Ariadne Au.xiiiary Schooner '''305

, . Constance— Auxiliary Schooner *346, *366

. Design for a 15-footer =^384

Design for a Fislierman '*327

Fifty-seven-foot Cruising Launch ""514

Nauhaught (Gasolene Y''acht) "'286

...Sixty-foot House-boat .' '*473

.. .Two. House-boat Designs .*408

Designing Competition 424

Edn.ada ...116

Effort .'.'*267

New. England Fishing > ......470

New Jersey Coast 65

New York Aquarimn 30, -,88, 109

'Nova Scotia Angling ...131

Oalc Leaf Club Cainp 107

October Bear .„..i345

Old Colony Club ...184

r)uananiche and Sea Trout '....,.,244

Ouananiclie Season .259

Picture 205

Pike Destructiveness 380

Po.tpmac Anglers and Miiskoka. 242

Potomac Fishing 260

Rainbow Trout in Missouri 246

Rockefeller vs. Laraora 28

Rod and Reel Club 259

Roger Williams Park 50

Sacramento Trout 65

St. Lawrence Anglers 132

Salmon and Worms 245

Salmoji Cvilture in America 25

Salmon Fishing 66

Salmon Fishing in British Columbia "'W

Salmon Flies

-Salmon Scores ". . . . . 89

Salmon Season in Newfoundland 283

Salmon's Known History 183

Sand Lake Musings ...243, 261

Santa Catalina , 244

Santa Catalina Fishing .'. ; 149

Sawdust and Fish £322, 344

Sawdust and Fish Life 490

Scott on Angling 149

Seal Destructiveness. .'. 405

Sebago Salmon , 167

Sewage and Fish Life 27

Shark, Two-Headed 112

Sleep of Fislies 182

Successful Man 185

Sunfish Names 261

Sunrise on Lake N\'ashington 7

Sti)>pofe Fish Don't Bite at First (poetry) 185

State Fish and Private Waters 93

Firefly *368

".Forty Years On" 249

Gasolene Engines for Marine Propulsion. *491, *513

iGravesend Bay Y. R. A....'. .386

Har.msworth Cup Race 473

Ice Boating on the North Shrewsbury. *428

In a Cornish Lugger 30G

Ingomar *368

International Races 226

Interlake Y^ A 495

Irondequoit *171

Kolutoo " *151

Lanai *328

Lake Michigan, Racing Summary 1903 *324

Lake Micbigan Yachtsmen , 512

Lake Sailing Skiff Association 474

Leda *2S5

Lloyds Rules for Yacht Building 249

Lloyds Yacht Register 54

Lysistrata Cup Challenge 386

Mab II *287

Marguerite *287

j Massachusetts Y. R. A ^.287

188 ! Mimosa ''T91

National Motor Boat Exposition 285

Measurement of Racing Yachts 407, 471, 514

Obituary :

Arthur E. Payne, M. I. N. A 267

Flenry Steers 288

Joseph N. Nelson 385

Edward Marsh Brown .' 475

Praxilla *191

Reliance *209

Robin Hood *429

Shamrock III *209

Shamrock III.'s Trials 13, 50, 76, 96, 133

j Spasm *286

I Speed of Racing Yachts 268

Southern Y. C 474

Thorella II *151

Iransatlautic Clipper Service *385

Tame Fish of Logan. Tarnon Record

47 70

N'ingt et L'n Speed Record.

Wenonah in Collision

Western Ice Yachting.,...

.386 .156 .494

Ocean Race 365'

Ocean Racing on the Pacific 424

Y. R. A. of L. I. S 365-

Clubs and Races.

American 35, 226-

America's Cup Races 155, ^69, *187, 20T

Annisquam 96, 136, 188-

Astor Cup 9i

Atlantic 35, 36, 76, 115, 152, 21'0, 226, 248, 32T

Bar Harbor 53, 116, 137, 153

Bayswater 116-

Bensonhurst 52, 207, 225, 247:

Bergen Beach 247-

Beverly (Mass.) 15, 36, 74, 95, 153, 248

Beverly (N. J.) 288

B everly Sea wanh aka Corinthian 7&.

Boston 15, 96, 134, 190, 248-

Bridgeport 115

Bristol 15, 247

Brooklyn 115, 136, 209'

Canada's Cup Races 134, 150, 154

Cape Cod 190

Canarsie 136, 20^

City of Boston 3^

Chesapeake Bay -171

Cohasset 16, 31, 50, 74, 95

Columbia (Chicago) , 31

Columbia (South Boston) ,.16, 74,-136

Corinthian (Marblehead) 36,. 74, 15.3, 208

Corinthian (Stamford) 15, 116

Duxbury 16, 37, 52, 77, 96, 136, 208, 24§

Eastern 36, 95, 136, 20^

East Gloucester 190

Erie 53, 76, 116, 136, 171

Gloucester 15

Harlem 199

Hempstead Harbor 116

Horseshoe Harbor 152

Indian Harbor 13, 76, 113, 135, -209, 245

Jamaica Bay 208, 225

Keystone 225

Lake Y. R. A 136

Larchmont 35, 51, 208, 24J

Lynn 76., 24S

Manchester. ..19.0

Manhasset Bay 113, 226

Manhasset Bay Challenge Cup Races ...*33

Marine and Field 95

'Mattapoisett 50, 77

'Mosquito Fleet 7&

Newport ....241

Newport Special Thirties 53, 96. 116, 151, 171,.

... 208, 225, 247.'

Newport Trial Races 90-footers 115'

New York (Cruise) 75, 93-

New Y'ork 90-footers 32'

Nobnocket , laO*

Old Mill 1.5, 285

Orient Pleights 36

Pacific Interclub Y. A 248

Penataquit-Corinthian .3.3, 116

Portsmouth 5.3

Quincy 74, 13.5, 2S0

Raritan 115

Riverside 7(3^ 2i>6

Rivertoji igg

Rochester and Genesee Y. R. A ■. . . . 53

Savin Hill 77

Seawanhaka Corinthian 13, 36, 54, 136, 22&

Scawanhaka Cup Races II4

Sewell Cup Race , ' 152;

Shelter Island 36, 53, 76, 96, 136, 156.

Sippican 95_ 190.

South Boston 75. 1.37

.Stuyvesant 248-

Unqua-Corinthian .35.

^^'ellfieet ; 207

West End 15.

Western Yachting 15J

Williamsburg- 266.

Winthrop 50, 74, 96, 153;

\^611aston ig,

SteaiiI \''achts.

Elsa II ii(j

Intrepid 227

Noma *456

Roxina ...328

Tarantula 155^

CANOEING.

A. C. A. Amendments 77

A. C. A. Meet Announcement 97"

A. C. A. Regulations S't

Canoe Tent of the Nautilus Sailing Canoe *517

Cruising Competition

Whistlewing 475 Cruising Competition Awards , , .511

4

INDEX.

Page.

Executive Committee Meeting at Rochester. .. .369

A'lotor Canoe 117

:New \-ork C. C... 10, 54, 9G, 117, 210, 227, 249

TRA.PSHOOTING.

A. .\. T. S. L. Afro-American Albemarle

.230, 232

192

289

Allentown Trap 17, 59

Amateur or Professional 18

Amesbury G. C 174

Ashdown G. C...., ^ 80

Ashland G. C 430, 477

Aquehonga G. C ....476

Aquidneck G. C 412, 430, 478

jBaden-Lick Gun Club 498

IBaltimore Shooting Association ...19, 38, 100

iBerea G. C , 289

JBerkshire County T. L , 80

iBeveridge, C. C 157

3inghamtpn R and G. C 89

Birch Brook G. C 20, 80, 138^ 156, 192, 229

Boone G. C 389

Boston, Athletic Club 39

Boston G. C 19, 57, 80, 140

Bound Brook 389, 478

Brooklyn 38, 57, 120, 138, 158, 229, 290, 350, 370,

389, 431, 476, 498

Brown and Sharpe G. C 19

Buffalo Audubon Club 40, 80, 120

Cartridges, Pilfering 520

CatskiU G. C... 56

Championship Gregory County,, 158

Chesapeake G. C ,. 20

Choke Boring 411

Chicago G. C 172, 229, 350, 388, 478

Cincinnati Clubs 391, 478

Cincinnati G. C 18, 20, 39, 80, 98, 120, 140, 176,

194, 212, 231, 250, 270, 289, 332, 351, 388, 412,

430, 477, 4%, 519

-Clearvie-iv G. C 120, 156, 172, 250, 330

•Cleveland Trap 498

•Colt G. C 98, 138

•Corner K. and G. C 350

Crescent Athletic Club.... 330, 350, 370, 389, 431, 476

Cripple Creek, Colorado Springs 20

Decatur, 111., Doings 19

Delta Trap 174

jDog Days and Club Days 20

IDover Sportsmen's Association 56, 152, 232

;Duluth G. C 80

ISast End G. C 290

:Emerald G. C 18, 173, 251

IFairvievy 478

Florists' G. C 138

Franklin G. C 272, 372,^ 389, 412, 430, 478

Freeport G. C 498

Fremont G. C 310, 331, 852, 372, 392

Frog Inn G. C 100

Fulton G. C 308, 370, 431, 476

Carfield G. C...20, 56, 80, 100, 120, 139, 158, 174, 192, 211, 229, 251, 272, 292, 309, 382, 350, 372

<3erard Point G. C 269, 331

<^rafton Trap..... 99

■-Grand Rapids G. C ..56

'Greek vs. Greek 174

Guttenburg Trap ....498

Flarrisburg Shooting Association ....269

Haverhill G. C M

Page.

Hell Gate G. C 18, 194, 412

Hellam G. C 173

Highland 192, 519

Hillside G. C 212

Hill Top Club 58

Hudson G. C 18, 158, 251, 289, 430, 478

Imperial G. C 388, 477

Independent G. C 56

Indianapolis G. C 79, 120, 157, 192

Infallible G. C 100

Interstate Association 352, 497

Jackson Park G. C 140, 289, 333, 498

Jacksonville Trap 392

Jeannette G. C 80, 173, 251

Keystone G. C 79

Lake Denmark Trap 350, 498

Litchfield Trap 19, 98

Lyons G. C 211

Mahanoy City G. C ..212

McConnelsville G. C 332

Meadow Spring G. C 98, 250

Middleton G. C '. 157

Milbrook G. C 173, 330, 388

Mineola Athletic Club ...419

Missouri Items 78

Momence Trap 330

Mountaineers' G. C 140, 174

Mountainside G. C 19, 39, 140, 173, 232, 478

Mt. Sterling G. C 352

M. V. T. S. and G. P. A 17

National G. C, Milwaukee 172

National G. C 40

Nebraska State G. C 212

Newark G. C 120

New York A. C 289, 352, 478, 498

Ne\y York German G. C... 173

Nishoyne G. C. 79, 251, 292

Northern Valley G. C 291

North River G. C....18, 89, 120, 140, 168, 173, 194, 211, 232, 272, 308, 330, 412, 478, 519

Official Organs 30S

Olean G. C... 56

Olney Trap 232

Optical 139

Ossining G. C....20, 57, 100, 140, 172, 231, 251, 270, 310, 352, 388, 431, 477, 519, 520

Omaha Trap 57, 78, 139, 519

Parker G. C 231

Pattenburg G. C 99, 194, 272, 372, 389, 478

Pawtuxet G, C 192, 252, 269, 309

Peters Trophy , 412

Phellis Trophy....,,... 232

Pittsfield R. and G. C 57

Point Breeze 270, 476, 498

Poughkeepsie G. C 57, 78, 98, 1L8, 151, 168, 174

192, 211, 229, 251, 269, 310, 330, 352, 389, 412, 430,

476, 496, 519

Prospect Shooting Association 351

Rahway G. C 158, 270

Reading Trap 79, 157, 330, 392, 477, 496

Recoil , 270

Recreation G. C 331

Remington G. C. US

Richmond G. C 56, 231, 478

Ridge, Howard 230

Rising Sun G. C 60

Riverside G. C 38, 231, 412, 477

Rochester G. C 19, 40, 100, 120, 176, 291, 309,

330, 371, 412

Rock Pigeon ,, 312

Schuylkill County League 292

Page.

Shcepshead Bay G. C...18, 80, 158, 173, 229, 251, 292,

308, 350, 412, 431, 476

Shot Experiments 372

Shot Sizes.. 252

South Side G. C 261

Sparta C;. C 156, 194, 270, 371

S. S. White G. C , 498

S. S. C. Banquet 476

Topeka G. C 232, 269

Tower Trap 520

Trenton S. A ....140

Union G. C ^ 56

Waynesboro G. C 56

Winchester G. C 19, 140, 211, 269

Wilmington Trap 252, 519

Winnipeg G. C 100

Woodard, B. Leroy , 167

W. P. T. L..,, 332

Matches.

Annapolis- Analostan ■. 389

Bellefonte-Tyrone 250

Birmingham-Nashville 194

Clark-Witzegreuter 411

Clearview-Hig;hland 100

Crescent-Princeton 498

Felix-Miller .39, 519

Gorman-Kleinman 250

Harrisburg-Lykens 211, 291

Heritage-Eaton 211

Intercollegiate Contest 430

Lehigh-Independent 289

Miller-Felix 250

Ross-Batjer ,.478

Watts- Werner-Simpson 330

Tournaments.

Afro- American .,..332

Alabama State 174

Altoona R. and G. C 60

Ardmore , , 119

Arkadelphia 194

Arkansas 59

Avon 351

Baltimore Shooting A^ociation 352

Bass Lake 157

Binghamton R. and G. G 290

Bonesteel G. C 79

Bowling Green G. C 60

Brookland 252

^ownsville R. and G. C ,138

Bunker Hill 119

Charleston 80

Charlottesville .100

Cumberland G. C 432

Cleveland 231

Clinton G. C 337

Coliser G. C 352

Columbus Grove 310

Dalton 331

Davenport 139

Davies County G. C. 310

Decatur 389

Derry 194

Dominion T. and G. P. A 59, 175

Du Bois 232

Forest City 78

Franklin, O 388

Fredericktown 272

Fremont 372

Ft. Dodge 19

Fulton ,..292

Page.

Gilbert-Burmister , 173

Glen Rock 140

Griesemer's 174

Hamilton ...388

Hilltop Handicap 311

Hot Springs ..174

Indian 193

Indianapolis G. C 269

Illinois State 157, 291

Interstate Associatioti 432

International 99

Junction City 40

Lexington 291

Keystone G. C , 40

Litchfield 252

Little Rock 351

Lynchburg 229

Mahanoy City 99, 332

Marshalltown G. C 60, 138

Michigan State League , 19

Morristown 56

Minot , 58

Missouri State Amateur, ....312

Mountaineers' G. C 252

Mt. Kisco 60

National G. C 39d, 459

Nevada Annual 309

New London, la., G. C 390

North White Plains G. C .290

N. D. S. A ., 5a

Ocean City 173

Olean 352

Olney 139

Omaha 331

Paducah 352

Perry County 261, 270

Prairie City ....351

Providence- Aquidneck 100

Remington G. C 60

Renovo 232

Rochester ., 212

Rylands 310

Shamokin 140, 292, 431

vSherbrooke G. C 40

Springfield Shooting Club 157, 231

St. Louis 371

S. T. S. G. and F, P. A 38, 67

Troy 27^2

Valley City ,39

Wabash 40

Washburn 232

Watseka 40

West Baden 329

West Branch R. and G. C .......270

West Fairview 120

Whitney-Miller ...............211, 310

Winnipeg 79

Wissinoming ..290

Witchery Blewland 459

Wood County 308

Worcester Sportsmen's Association........ 290

W. P. T. L. at Allegheny, 309

W. P. T. L. at Ligonier,. 79,251

W. P. T, L. at New Castle 18

Interstate Tournaments.

At Rutherford 20

At Huntsville 58

At La Crosse 119

At Ottawa 158

At Akron ....212

At Scranton 271

AND Stream.

A Weekly Journal of the Rod and Gun.

OoPYRlGIlt, was B* FotoSST /tHiJ SrREAl« PuBtfeklNG €&.

TERMS, $4 A '^'ear. 10 Cts. a Coi'Y. I Six Months, $2. f

Nt:W YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1903

I VOL. LXI.— No. 1.

iNo. 846 Broadway, New York

For my own part, I wish the Bald Eagle had not been choseri Ms tke ffepresehtative of our country; he is a bird of bad mo^al ciiafacter;.he does iiot gfet tiS liviii^ honestly. . . With all his irijustice, he is rievei" in good cise, but, like tjiosfe among men who live by sharping arid fobbing, hfe is geriefally j^oof, arid often very lousy. Besides, he. is a rarik cowafd. . .. 1 atri, oil this account, not displeased that the figure is not known as a Bald Eagle, hut looks more like a turkey. For, in tfuth, the turkey is, in comparison a much more respectable bird, and withal a true, original native of America. Eagles have been found in all countries, but the turkey was peculiar to ours. He is besides (tho a little vain and silly, 'tis true, but none the worse eiiiblem for that), a bird of courage, and would not hesitate to attack a grenadier of the British Guards, who should presume to Inv&de his fwmy&rd with a ted eoat on.-Benjamin Franklin.

RICH AND POOR. There is a class of shallow thbkefs and agitated faiiefg flgalnst tile rklii who pfoffess to sgg a hogy-nlail in tke wealthy #bft§mah, and ib disfotef iii hi§ eVil nla^ fhinations the source of all legal restrictions ,iill lieense 111 sport. As thus the editor of the Caledonia (M; Y:) Advertlsef :

' "6i-adualiy the weaith^^ meti of the Empire State are getting the right to fish and Hunt entirely iri theif own hands!' The law passed hy the Legislature of the Statd last winter and signed by the Governor, prohibits the sale of orouse and woodcock in this State at any time durmg The year. Tliat is to say, that woodcock and grouse arc only for wealthy men to hunt, as the poor classes are the market hunters. One hunts for the money that's m it, the ether for what he terms sport and the good eatmg that s to follow. We admire the man who hunts for the money in it far the most."

If the Advertiser man knew more about it. he would recognize that the interests of the "wealthy man" and of "the°man who hunts for the money in it" are identical. Game is a table luxury, it costs money, and as a general rule is served at expensive restaurants and hotels. If it were not a costly article, if the market hunter who kills it were not paid a good price for it, he would not be so eager to "hunt for the money In it." And because game is a luxury, its consumption is chiefly by the wealthy. The "poor" market hunter kihs it, the "wealthy men of the Empire State" pay him for it. Neither the poor mar- ket hunter nor the wealthy bon vivant approves the law forbidding the traffic in game. Both share the opinion of the Advertiser man that game birds should bs snared atid gfoutid-potted for market. If they had their V/ay, the dose season laws and the anti-snaring laws and the anti-sale laws would not be in foree. That sueh laws are in operation is due to the fact that in New York, as in the majority of States, the public has come to a realiz;- itig sense that if the game is to be saved it must be kept out of the snares of "the man who hunts for the money in it" and oflf from the tables of "the wealthy men."

The statutes of which the Caledonia man makes plaint as class legislation are In the highest degree expressions of the principle of the greatest good to the greatest num- ber. The men in this Country who shoot and fish are the average men who make up the community. They are not all rich nor all poor. Some have ample means of money ,and leisure, others must count most carefully the cost in dollars and hours. Whatever their ciurcumstances and station in life, all alike have the right to such .enjoyment of stream and game cover as their individual opportuni- ties will permit, and as may be compatible with the com- m,on interest. The game and fish laws are in principle and intent no respecters of persons. Their purpose is lo conserve the game and the fish for the common use of all. But, as has frequently been said in these columns, the protective laws are most necessary and most beneficial in behalf of the man of limited means, the one who can- not afford to indulge in long distance railway fares, hotel bills and guide wages, but must find his sport in home fields and local waters. He, the sportsman who must hunt and fish near home, if at all, is the one who is most nearly concerned and most vitally interested in putting a stop to "hunting for the money in it." Why? Because there is not game enough for the market hunter and the men who hunt for sport. Because if the market hunter has his swing, making a business of taking game, he will clean out the covers so that there will be nothing left for the rest of us who chose to earn a living in some other way than by grouse-snaring, but who do desire for recreation to take a day off in the fields when the gpason Qpines around. Any system -which insures to us

and to our cliildren the contitiuance of these privileges which our fathers enjoyed is in the highest degree for the best good of all. Any other sVstem, such as that which the Caledonia editor appears to favor, by givh-fg over the birds to the market hunter and the patron of cold storage game vaults, robs the many for the few.

No intelligent obsefvef of the trend and development of the fish and game legislation of the country during re- cent years can mistake it§ e'Haraetef. At flO Other period has the purpose been more definitely aiid eleat'ly to estab- lish beyond question the principle that the game and the privilege of J:aking it belong to the whole people, and Will be secured to them, and not to anv one selfish class.

THE GAME PRESERVE. As A factor in the matters of modern sportmanship as they pertain to the use of the dog and gun in field shoot- ing, the game preserve may be considered properly as a constant. It is An e'siabiished institution of sportsman- ship in- the United States, aS it iS itl Europe, and it has come to stay. Its permanency indifcattd ill many material ways. In Europe, in many countries, it has ex- isted through generations far into the past, and no prop- erty fight is more highly prized nor more jealously guarded; The faet that many European countries have monarchical fofms of govgfnments is irrelevant to the sub- ject of private game pfeServe'S.- They are a consequent to man's passionate fondness for the chase and the com- petition incidental to civilization. This foiidness is a phenomenon of human nature universally, and thefefore, in its origin, is independent of governments or conventions of any kind. There are certain principles of ownership, possession and enjoyment of property which are the same everywhere in civilization, and which, in civilization, be- come more and more affirmed with the passing years with the increased common sense of the common people as a whole.

In the United States the private game preserve did not have its origin in imitation of foreign methods of sports- manship. It had its origin in accord with the natural laws of supply and demand. The natural game supply and available common areas of hunting grounds, once so abundant, became wholly inadequate to supply the de- mand. Artificial methods of game preservation were a necessity of the situation, if Sport with dog and gun were to be secured to a reasonable certainty. In the United States, at the present time, the game preserve, as an institution of sportsmanship, is to be found in eveiry sec- tion, is progressively enlarging with the passing of the years, is indorsed by men of all stations of life, of all de- grees of financial standing, and is well within the natural rights of man and the laws of the land. A sentimental opposition to it avails nothing. The rights of the prop- erty owner existed as fully and forcibly through all the past years of free shooting everywhere as they do t;o-day ; but owing to the circumstances of vast areas in a wild state and a superabundance of game, owners permitted their property rights to lie dormant. When they chose to assert their property rights, they introduced no new principles of ownership. There, however, was much to be thankful for during all the years of freedom to enjoy private property, rather than anything to resent when the freedom, by suft'erance, ended.

The idea of the game preserve had its origin before the era of preserve ownership in a legal way. In the old daj's when a sportsman found a sequestered section abounding in game birds or fish, he carefully concealed its whereabouts, and year after year he enjoyed the fun and fruits of his superior knowledge. If anyone else dis- covered and invaded it, the original discoverer considered the other fellow as an offensive interloper. Herein lies all the principle of the game preserve, which had its origin in such primitive beginnings. What the ancient sportsman accomplished by stealthy secrecy and technical trespass, the modern sportsman accomplishes openly and legally as a matter of business under the universal laws of supply and demand, and instead of diminishing the area devoted to the game preserve will progressively in- crease till the available lands are all taken, or the gen- eral increase in land values shall act as a -check.

In establishing and maintaining a game preserve, the sportsmen of the United States will be confronted with the same problems which exist in foreign countries. Tlie presgryes raust be stocj^ed and restocked if good shooting

IS to be insured. Artificial methods of propagation will need to be resorted to, and methods to protect the game birds and fisfies from marauders, whether man, dog or ^-ermin, will be a constant necessity.

THE VAGRANT DOG IN THE GAME FIELD.

A FACTOR in the- maintenance of the game supply gf S region is the vagrant dog which is permitted to run at large in the cover in close season. It makes no difference whether the animal is well bred or a cur. A dog, when permitted to wander about at will, exercises many of his wild traits of a predatory nature. He has no perception whatever of property rights. He will chase rabbits with unbounded enjoyment. He will rob the nests of game birds, kill and eat the young quail and partridges, and betimes he will harry and kill sheep. Hounds in particu- lar are conspicuous offenders. They have an insatiable appetite, are eminently vagrant and predatory in their habits, and from their keen sense of smell, great endur- ance and skill in pack work, have superlative powers of predatory destructiveness. If they fail in their eflforts to secure rabbits, the eggs of quail, partridges, hens, etc., they do not hesitate to invade cornfields when the corn is in the milk, tear if down and feed on it much after the manner of hogS. In the South the vagrant cur is particu- larly and offensively destructive. No owner has any right to permit his dog or dogs to run at large, and the more offensive or destructive vagrant dogs become, the less value will dogs have in the e3'e of the law. The vagrant dog is one of the chief problems which game preserve owners have to meet, but there is no doubt that, when it becomes serious enough, it will be fully settled, and not at all to the advantage of the dog.

In a suit brought by the New York Forest, Fish and Game Commission against one Dunston, a New York city restaurant keeper, to collect the penalty for the ser^'ing of four quail in his restaurant out of season, the lower court dismissed the case, on the ground that al- though the birds had been served to a customer of Dunston in Dunston's restaurant by Dunston's waiter, there was no evidence to show that they had ever been in Dunston's possession, and Dunston therefore could not be held liable. This appears to be a loophole as big as a barndoor through wdiich restaurant keepers may pass cartloads of illegal game. The Appellate Term of the Superior Court has just sustained the action of the Municipal Cour